Should I Give a Recorded Statement to The Insurance Company After an Accident?

Soon after you have been in an accident, whether it is car accident, motorcycle accident, bicycle accident a slip and fall on a slippery substance of a supermarket, or other injury-producing event, the insurance company for the person or business that was at fault will call you, asking to take a recorded statement of your memory of the events leading up to your injuries, as well as the extent of your injuries, time off work, and so forth. Should you agree to give the investigator a statement?

The answer is an unqualified and resounding “NO.” The adjuster will often frame his or her questions in a way that is designed for you to say that the other driver or the business was not careless and the accident was the victim’s own fault by not paying sufficient attention to where he or she was walking or what he or she was doing. If the adjuster can’t get the victim to say that he or she was the cause of the accident, the investigator will try to get the victim to admit that he or she was partially at fault for the accident.

The investigator will also inquire into the injuries the victim suffered. The investigator often will want to take the recorded statement as soon as possible after the incident, often before all of the victim’s injuries have shown up or the severity of his or her injuries cannot be determined. If an insurance company’s investigator wants to take your statement, unless the injuries and property damage are minimal, you should refuse to give the adjuster a statement until you have retained competent legal counsel who knows the “tricks of the insurance trade” and will guard your rights diligently.

Before you give a recorded statement, talk to a lawyer who can properly advise you on the next course of action.  Call us today for a free consultation of your claim.  Also, make sure to order your free California personal injury book today.


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